Best Scopes for 6.5 Creedmoor – for each purpose and budget!

by Dave Chesson

March 20, 2024

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If you own a 6.5 Creedmoor caliber rifle (like I do), you’ll want a good scope to go with it. Without it, you can’t get the range it was designed for. Furthermore, since many of the 6.5 Creedmoor rifles can be on the pricey side, if you’re going to get one, you might as well get the proper glass to go with it.

So, since I’m constantly asked by friends and colleagues what I think is the best scope for 6.5 creedmoor rifle, I decided to break down my favorite picks with special considerations for the application of the rifle and your budget – because there are really important “it depends” criterion.

Types of Scopes for 6.5 Creedmoor Rifles

No, not all scopes are equal. If you ask me which scope I recommend for your rifle, I’m going to answer “it depends.” What does it depend on? It depends on what you want to use your 6.5 CM rifle for.

For example, there are two drastically different scopes I’d recommend for long range shooting and lightweight hunting – each would excel at what they’re meant for and fall seriously short at the other task.

Hunting 6.5 Creedmoor Scopes: Hunting scopes are generally lighter-weight and have capped turrets (so that they’re not easily bumped in the field). Also, a hunting scope often features simple reticles for easy use in low light which is designed with a Second Focal Plane (SFP), and typically has a diameter of 1 inch.

Long Range / Precision Shooting Scopes for 6.5 Creedmoor: These long range 6.5 scopes are more expensive (but not always), and bigger/heavier. They feature easy-to-adjust exposed turrets, complicated reticles, and typically have tube diameters between 30-35mm. If you have a Ruger Precision Rifle, A Tikka TAC A1, or similar precision rifle, this is the scope category for you.

How I Chose the Best Scopes for 6.5 Creedmoor?

As someone who’s spent years hunting with the 6.5 Creedmoor (currently using and loving the Tikka T3x), I’ve tried plenty of scopes with different purposes. From my experience, I can easily spot the good ones from the bad. When putting together this list, I considered factors like reliability, glass quality, reticle, ergonomics, and value.

I didn’t stop with just my opinion though. I reached out to some fellow hunters I know, folks who really know their stuff, to get their take on the scopes I’ve listed here. Their recommendations helped me put together a solid list of the best scopes for the 6.5 Creedmoor.

Remember, scopes are personal, and what works for me might not be your cup of tea. That’s why I’ve included a variety of options here, along with a handy buyer’s guide to help you out. So let’s jump right in!

Author’s Choice of the Best Scopes for 6.5 Creedmoor:

In the below table, you can find our favorite rifle scope in each of the categories that you might use your 6.5 Creedmoor for.

Best Scopes For 6.5 Creedmoor

Vortex Viper PST II 5-25x50
  • Quality at a fair price
  • Beginner Friendly
  • Relatively inexpensive
Check Price
Maven RS.2 2-10x38
  • 12 ounces, super lightweight
  • Amazing glass
  • Shockingly durable
Check Price
Primary Arms SLx 4-14x44
  • Inexpensive
  • Durable
  • Great features for the price
Check Price
BEST PRECISION RIFLE

Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25×56

Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25x56
  • Made (mostly) in America!
  • Japanese sourced glass, it’s the best
  • Lots of reticle options
Check Price

However, if you’re interested in seeing a list of individual scopes in each category, you can scroll down (or click the category of scope below) and see how each optic ranked with more detail.

The best scope for a 6.5 Creedmoor rifle is:

  1. Best Overall: Vortex Viper PST 2 5-25×50
  2. Best for Hunting: Maven RS.2 2-10×38
  3. Best Budget: Primary Arms SLX 4-14×44
  4. Best Precision: Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25×56

Let’s dive into a review of each scope we tested (8 in total).

Review of the Top 6.5 Creedmoor Scopes

To begin with this list of my favorite 6.5 creedmoor scopes, I started wth the four categories of the Best overall, hunting, budget and then precision. However, as you’ll see, I then listed other precision options below the #1 choice since I’ve had a lot of experience with precision and competition.

#1. Best Overall Vortex Viper PST II 5-25×50

Editor's Choice
Vortex Viper PST II 5-25x50

Vortex Viper PST II 5-25×50

In a niche where the best scopes can run $3,000-$5,000, the Viper PST II delivers the quality you need at a price you can afford.

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  • Reliability A+
  • Glass B+
  • Reticle A
  • Ergonomics A-
  • Value A+

Our Grade

A

Reader’s Grade

A

Based on 9 Reviews

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Viper PST II 5-25×50 Specs

  • Magnification Range 5-25x
  • Focal Plane FFP
  • Weight 31.2 Oz
  • Length 15.79in
  • FoV @ 100y 24.1ft/4.8 ft
  • Illuminated Yes
  • Total Elevation Adjustment 70 MOA
  • Tube Size 30mm
  • Zero Stop Yes

Vortex Viper PST II 5-25×50 Review 

It’s almost become a running joke in the long range community that all you need to start is a Bergara B-14 and a Viper PST II. Why? Because it’s simply good and accessible.

This, along with my years of personal experience with this scope, is why I gave it the “best overall” rating. I wouldn’t call the Vortex Viper PST II my favorite scope, but it is a reliable all-rounder that can get a lot done without breaking the bank.

This scope comes in MOA and MRAD with multiple reticle styles each, it’s not hard to find what works well for you personally. With Vortex’s amazing warranty and customer service, this is a safe bet to spend your money on.

Most long range shooters that want to get further into the sport will end up replacing their Vipers, but this is a great scope to learn on and can easily take you past 1,000 yards.

If you want a budget-friendly scope that’s reliable and offers clear optics to help you extend your range, I highly recommend the Viper PST II. Personally, I would get it with the ERB-7C reticle and in MRAD. You can read my detailed review of the Vortex Viper PST here.

Viper PST II 5-25×50 Pros and Cons

  • Very beginner-friendly design and price
  • Quality glass and construction
  • Vortex’s RZR Zero Stop is one of the best
  • Turrets aren’t as “clicky” as I like

Vortex Viper PST II 5-25×50 Deals

#2. Best Hunting Maven RS.2 2-10×38

Maven RS.2 2-10x38

Maven RS.2 2-10×38

One of the lesser-known brands in the world of optics, Maven has some truly amazing gear. From binoculars to scopes, these guys know glass and it shows.

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  • Reliability A
  • Glass A
  • Reticle B+
  • Ergonomics A-
  • Value A+

Our Grade

A

Reader’s Grade

B

Based on 1 Reviews

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Maven RS.2 2-10×38 Specs

  • Magnification Range 2-10x
  • Focal Plane SFP
  • Weight 12.4Oz
  • Length 12.44in
  • FoV @ 100y 42.2ft/10.5ft
  • Illuminated No
  • Total Elevation Adjustment 50 MOA
  • Tube Size 1in
  • Zero Stop No

Maven RS.2 2-10×38 Review 

Ultralight scopes are hard to find and are often subpar. They all scream the fact that their first and only design consideration is weight and nothing else.

Now, Maven broke this norm of ultralight, offering a $500, 12-ounce model that feels like a high-end optic. Though I considered it for the budget scope category, its quality feel and performance on my hunting rifle sets it apart which made me list it here for hunting.

Another thing I love about the Maven is that it offers unique custom options as they sell directly, not in stores. You can even get your optic engraved or in a custom color for a personal touch, ensuring you look good for that 10-point buck photo – not bad for a budget option as well.

However, again, because of its light-weight, great quality and excellent ROI (based on the price verses its quality), I listed this as my #1 choice for hunting. Granted, there might be more accurate or more premium hunting options out there – however, as the scale in pricing quickly and dramatically increases, the return gives minimal output in increased quality.

Maven RS.2 2-10×38 Pros and Cons

  • Super lightweight
  • Amazing glass quality
  • Very simple to use
  • Limited by tube size
  • Only 10x

Maven RS.2 2-10×38 Deals

#3. Best Budget Primary Arms SLx 4-14×44

Primary Arms SLx 4-14x44

Primary Arms SLx 4-14×44

Coming in as the cheapest scope I can recommend, Primary Arms packs a surprising amount of features into this little guy.

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  • Reliability B+
  • Glass B-
  • Reticle A+
  • Ergonomics A-
  • Value A+

Our Grade

A-

Reader’s Grade

A-

Based on 2 Reviews

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Primary Arms SLx 4-14×44 Specs

  • Magnification Range 4-14x
  • Focal Plane FFP
  • Weight 25.2 Oz
  • Length 12.9in
  • FoV @ 100y 27.20ft/7.85ft
  • Illuminated Yes
  • Total Elevation Adjustment 60 MOA
  • Tube Size 30mm
  • Zero Stop No

Primary Arms SLx 4-14×44 Review

I’ve always been impressed by Primary Arm’s optics. Something that really helps them stand out is that they do a ton of their own research and development and it really shows. From reticles to construction, they are always pushing the limit.

And while that sounds amazing, the SLx isn’t a fancy scope. But it does have some nice features like an amazing reticle and great illumination. 

Truthfully, I like it because it’s a good beater scope. Not every scope needs to be the best or the fanciest. Sometimes, just a good reliable scope is all you need. For whitetail, boar, or close varmints this is perfect – probably not for an elk hunt though haha.

You’ll struggle at long range, but if you’re only shooting about 300 yards or less — this is entirely enough. I haven’t managed to break a PA scope yet but if you do manage it, at least this is cheap enough that it won’t ruin your day. Overall, it’s the best budget scope for a 6.5 Creedmoor rifle.

Primary Arms SLx 4-14×44 Pros and Cons

  • Budget-friendly
  • Bright illumination
  • Glass is what you pay for

Primary Arms SLx 4-14×44 Deals

#4. Best Precision Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25×56

Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25x56

Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25×56

While Leupold gets their glass from Japan, they make everything else and assemble the final scope using American workers in an American plant. And it’s an outstanding scope.

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  • Reliability A-
  • Glass A
  • Reticle B+
  • Ergonomics A+
  • Value B-

Our Grade

A-

Reader’s Grade

A+

Based on 6 Reviews

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Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25×56 Specs

  • Magnification Range 5-25x
  • Focal Plane FFP
  • Weight 30 Oz
  • Length 15.7in
  • FoV @ 100y 20.4ft/4.2ft
  • Illuminated Yes
  • Total Elevation Adjustment 120 MOA
  • Tube Size 35mm
  • Zero Stop Yes

Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25×56 Review

The biggest thing going for the Leupold Mark 5HD is that it’s American-made which makes it unique among high-end scopes. Facts of life are that most optics from the cheap to the new-car money aren’t made in the USA. Leupold sets themselves apart as being one of the only ones that make it happen. Granted, the glass is from Japan — but that is because you just can’t get glass good enough domestically. 

On top of all of that, the Mark 5HD is simply a great optic. The glass is great, the turrets are nice, and the construction is top-notch.

However, my biggest gripe about Mark 5HD is the price. It starts at $2,100 MSRP, but depending on the reticle, you might end up paying as much as $2,900 MSRP. That’s a hefty jump. Usually, we’d expect to pay an extra $200-$300 for the fancier Horus reticles, not an extra $800.

Now, personally, it was tough for me to give this scope the 1st place among the best precision scopes, but it’s my go-to workhorse for long-range use on various rifles. I particularly favor it on my 6.5 Creedmoor rifle and also use it on my 300 PRC rifle.

Furthermore, as you can see from the reader grades for this scope(something special we do at Gun University is give readers that ability to leave a grade), it would appear that others agree even with its price.

Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25×56 Pros and Cons

  • Lots of reticle options
  • Made in America
  • Leupold has a long history of quality
  • Outstanding glass quality
  • 35mm mounts can be harder to find and more expensive.
  • Upcharging hard for the best reticles

Leupold Mark 5HD 5-25×56 Deals

#5. Nightforce ATACR 7-35×56

Nightforce ATACR 7-35x56 F1

Nightforce ATACR 7-35×56

Nightforce has a long history as being one of the most durable optics manufacturers in the world. Trusted by militaries and adopted by USSOCOM, Nightforce is simply one of the best.

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  • Reliability A+
  • Glass A
  • Reticle A+
  • Ergonomics A
  • Value B-

Our Grade

A

Reader’s Grade

A-

Based on 5 Reviews

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Nightforce ATACR 7-35×56 Specs

  • Magnification Range 7-35x
  • Focal Plane FFP
  • Weight 39.3 Oz
  • Length 16in
  • FoV @ 100y 15ft/3.4ft
  • Illuminated Yes
  • Total Elevation Adjustment 100 MOA
  • Tube Size 34mm
  • Zero Stop Yes

Nightforce ATACR 7-35×56 Review

The ATACR has been a king in PRS and NRL for years and is used by militaries worldwide. It’s not only incredibly durable but also one of the best optics available. The best glass, the best controls, the best tracking, everything about the ATACR is built to last and built to fight.

Plus, one thing I love about Nightforce as a company is that IF you manage to break one, Nightforce is there to help you out.

If you need a scope you can rely on with your life, you want that track record of durability and trust. For that level of assurance, nothing beats the ATACR.

The only downside to the ATACR is that it’s starting to show its age. While it’s not the oldest option out there, it’s not the newest either.

This scope nearly took first place, but I feel it falls behind Leupold. There’s just something about using these scopes that I don’t enjoy as much as the Leupold, with its generous eye relief. You can read the full review of the ATACR 7 here.

Nightforce ATACR 7-35×56 Pros and Cons

  • Truly unbeatable durability
  • Reticle options are awesome
  • Nightforce customer service is legendary
  • Very high price
  • Glass quality doesn’t match up with the cost

Nightforce ATACR 7-35×56 Deals

#6 Vortex Razor HD Gen II 4.5-27×56

Vortex Razor HD Gen II 4.5-27x56

Vortex Razor HD Gen II 4.5-27×56

One of the most legendary scopes ever made, Vortex Razor HD II is a standard that others are measured by.

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  • Reliability A+
  • Glass A
  • Reticle A
  • Ergonomics A
  • Value A+

Our Grade

A

Reader’s Grade

A

Based on 4 Reviews

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Vortex Razor HD Gen II 4.5-27×56 Specs

  • Magnification Range 4.5-27x
  • Focal Plane FFP
  • Weight 48.5 Oz
  • Length 14.4in
  • FoV @ 100y 25.3ft/4.4ft
  • Illuminated Yes
  • Total Elevation Adjustment 113.5 MOA
  • Tube Size 34mm
  • Zero Stop Yes

Vortex Razor HD Gen II 4.5-27×56 Review

Ranked 3rd among the best precision rifles, the Razor HD Gen II has long set the gold standard. If you don’t want to spend $3,500+ on a scope, this is about the best that you can find right now. 

Vortex has won that respect the hard way, by winning matches. The glass is warm and wonderful, the construction is solid, and the turrets are some of the best in the industry even to this day. Overall, this is just a really great scope.

Though the MSRP is a bit high, you can often snag it on sale for around $1800-1900 which is a steal.

All of that said… it is getting a little dated at this point, especially after the GEN III’s release.

But, still the Gen II still has a good amount of sales and will be one of the best options you can buy as a rifle scope. You can check out the full review of the Razor HD Gen II here.

Vortex Razor HD Gen II Pros and Cons

  • Vortex warranty just can’t be beat
  • Prices can be surprisingly low
  • Minimum parallax is 32 yards
  • Heavy, 48.5 ounces is a beast

Vortex Razor HD Gen II 4.5-27×56 Deals

#7 EOTech Vudu 5-25×50

EOTECH VUDU 5-25×50

EOTech Vudu 5-25×50

A compact long range scope isn’t something that many have attempted and even fewer have done well, but EOTech has really hit a home run with the Vudu.

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  • Reliability A
  • Glass A-
  • Reticle A
  • Ergonomics A
  • Value A

Our Grade

A

Reader’s Grade

B

Based on 1 Reviews

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EOTech Vudu 5-25×50 Specs

  • Magnification Range 5-25x
  • Focal Plane FFP
  • Weight 29.5 Oz
  • Length 11.2in
  • FoV @ 100y 23.3ft/4.7ft
  • Illuminated Yes
  • Total Elevation Adjustment 100 MOA
  • Tube Size 34mm
  • Zero Stop Yes

EOTech Vudu 5-25×50 Review

If you pack your rifle a lot or need more rail space for night vision or thermals, a smaller-than-average scope can make a huge difference. With EOTech quality, excellent glass, and super-durable construction, the Vudu leads its class.

While most high-end scopes measure 13-16 inches long, so EOTech’s 11” option is quite surprising. The Vudu really gives you a lot of rail space back.

For many, it’s not a big deal, but if you’re using night vision or thermals for night hunting then the extra 2 to 5 inches can matter a lot. And with the rise in popularity of pistols in rifle calibers or SBRs for hunting, the Vudu can be a perfect fit.

This scope won’t suit everyone. Unless you need a compact option, you might find something else more suitable. But if compactness is what you need, this scope is outstanding.

Like any scope, the Vudu has its drawbacks. It’s kind of heavy, which is surprising given the saved inches. Also, with an objective lens of only 50mm, it’s a bit of a letdown in a world where most great optics are 56mm.

With that said, this scope is now my top choice for dusk hunts. Overall, its benefits outweigh the drawbacks, and it earns the 3th spot in my list of best precision Creedmoor 6.5 scopes.

EOTech Vudu 5-25×50 Review Pros and Cons

  • Compact design
  • Horus reticles
  • Very firm zero stop
  • Compact, but still heavy
  • No price reduction for the non-Horus reticle
  • 50mm when 56mm should be the standard

EOTech Vudu 5-25×50 Deals

#8 Athlon Cronus BTR Gen II 4.5-29×56

Athlon Cronus BTR Gen 2 4.5x29x56

Athlon Cronus BTR Gen II 4.5-29×56

The Conrus is a scope that just punches way, way outside of its price class. Easily on par with the Vortex Razor, the Cronus just doesn’t quit.

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  • Reliability A+
  • Glass A-
  • Reticle A-
  • Ergonomics A+
  • Value A+

Our Grade

A

Reader’s Grade

B

Based on 1 Reviews

Your Grade

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Added To Our Reader’s Score

Athlon Cronus BTR Gen II 4.5-29×56 Specs

  • Magnification Range 4.5-29x
  • Focal Plane FFP
  • Weight 38.5 Oz
  • Length 14.3in
  • FoV @ 100y 24.8ft/3.83ft
  • Illuminated Yes
  • Total Elevation Adjustment 110 MOA
  • Tube Size 34mm
  • Zero Stop Yes

Athlon Cronus BTR Gen II 4.5-29×56 Review

I’ve got two of these scopes. One’s on my NRL22 open class rifle and the other’s on my PRS open class rifle. They’re both really good.

I often compare Athlon to Vortex because the parallels are strikingly similar. Both offer industry-leading warranties and excellent customer service. Just like Vortex, Athlon is now earning the respect its scopes truly deserve despite facing similar challenges in the past.

I think the Cronus is on par with the Razor HD GEN II glass quality. I’ve shot 2 full seasons of NRL/PRS with my Cronus with all of the bumps, drops, and bangs that go with that, and both are still running strong, even after traveling thousands of miles in the back of my car.

Bottom line, this is a great scope. The best part? They’re relatively cheap. I paid $1,350 for my Gen II, and a current street price of around $1,400-1,500 still puts these hundreds of dollars below the Razor HD Gen II.

For a price-to-quality ratio, the Cronus BTR is unbeatable and for that reason, I ranked it the 6th in my list of best precision Creedmoor 6.5 scopes.

Athlon Cronus BTR Gen II 4.5-29×56 Pros and Cons

  • Insane value to price ratio
  • Turrets are LOUD and clicky
  • Athlon also has a Vortex-like warranty
  • Stock can be very hit and miss
  • Parallax can be very stiff at first, needs break-in.

Athlon Cronus BTR Gen 2 4.5-29×56 Deals

Buyer’s Guide For The Best 6.5 Creedmoor Scopes

Choosing a scope for your 6.5 Creedmoor rifle can be tricky, even for experienced shooters. You don’t want to spend too much on something that won’t work well with your rifle. In this guide, I’ll help you understand the scope options for the 6.5 Creedmoor and pick the best one for your needs.

Why These Exact Scopes For 6.5 Creedmoor?

The 6.5 Creedmoor is one of the most versatile cartridges ever made. It offers flatter shooting, less wind drift, and recoil compared to .308 Win, while still being lethal. It fits well in short-action rifles and shares compatibility with .308 Win magazines and brass which makes it easy for handloading.

It’s legal for hunting all game animals in North America within a reasonable distance and can hit targets over a mile away with good ammo and shooting skills.

From lightweight options like Maven to top-notch glass like Zero Compromise, these scopes cover all uses for a 6.5 Creedmoor rifle. Whether for backpacking hunts or national-level competitions, one of these scopes will serve you well.

Honestly Consider What You Need Your Scope To Do

Purpose: Firstly, it’s important to know what you’ll be doing with your 6.5 Creedmoor gun to understand which specifications matter most. Many shooters want a lightweight, versatile scope, but that’s not always realistic. Durability often means weight and top glass comes at a premium.

To avoid overspending on unnecessary features or buying a scope that won’t hold up to your needs, consider if you’ll use the gun for hunting, competition shooting, or regular use.

Now that you’ve identified the greatest use of your 6.5 Creedmoor rifle, let’s talk about the important features to consider when choosing a scope. There are things such as focal plane, weight, length, illumination, and more. 

Magnification Range: When checking a scope’s specs, you’ll see something like “2-25×50” or “4.5-29×56”. This tells you the entire magnification range from 2x to 25x with a 50mm objective lens, or 4.5x to 29x with a 56mm objective lens.

That range in magnification directly means how close an object will appear when looking through the scope. Twice as close to 25 times as close or 4 and a half times as close to 29 times as close.

A low minimum magnification is great for the big picture, like spotting game or finding targets in competition.

On the other hand, a higher maximum magnification gets you really close to the target but gives you a very small eye box (where your head can be in relation to the scope and still see through it).

Super-high magnification is excellent for precision but narrows your field of view significantly, making it harder to locate the next target.

Extremely high magnification can increase effects like mirage, caused by differences in air temperature, making it more difficult to see your target clearly.

There’s no “too low” for minimum magnification, but there is a limit for maximum. Most shooters rarely go past 20x in competitions, and for hunting, around 15x is common.

For most shooters, a scope with a range of 2x to 30x works well. Going beyond that can be unnecessary and may make the scope heavier, pricier, and reduce light transmission. Scopes offering extremely high magnification, like 40x or 60x, are niche and usually not needed for most shooters, except for specific competitions like F-Class.

FFP or SFP: For me, the first thing on my mind is the First Focal Plane (FFP) or Second Focal Plane (SFP).

In an FFP scope, the reticle size changes as you magnify, while an SFP scope keeps the reticle size constant regardless of magnification.

A reticle that changes with your magnification (FFP) will mean that your hash marks are always accurate. If you have a scope with 2 MOA between hash marks, it will always be 2 MOA. This is the same for MRAD or MOA as well.

If your reticle stays the same, it is a Second Focal Plane scope (SFP), your hash marks will only be calibrated for 1 magnification setting — normally the max magnification. 

FFP scopes are commonly preferred by long range target shooters. Whereas SFP is more commonly used by hunters. 

I personally prefer FFP scopes for their adaptability across magnification ranges. I never hunt at close range, but if your standard deer shot is 50 or 100 yards, SFP might be better so you can see the reticle in more detail.

After that, it depends on what you need to do with your rifle. To learn more about FFP vs SFP, head over to our article where we deep dive into this topic. 

Weight: If you’re hiking or hunting, weight matters. But if you’re stationary, like on a stand or benchrest, it’s less of a concern. For hunting, choose a lighter scope to ease your load, even though they may come with a higher price tag.

Field of View: Field of view (FOV) measures how wide your sight is. For instance, a 5ft FOV at 24x means you can see a 5-foot circle at that magnification.

FOV isn’t a big deal for me. While more is better, it’s limited by the objective size and magnification. Generally speaking, FOV will be similar between scopes with equal objectives and magnification.

Illumination: Most good scopes are going to come with illumination, but not all of them do. So why do you care?

Illumination means your reticle lights up. Some scopes sometimes only have part of the reticle illuminated, some scopes all of it does, it depends on the exact scope.

This basically gives you guaranteed contrast when shooting. 

An illuminated reticle is a huge deal when hunting. It’s invaluable if you’re dealing with cloud cover or hunting in the early or late hours of the day, especially when your target blends with the environment. It’s also handy at the range.

Many times, I’ve struggled to aim at a dark steel target against a similarly dark hill. When I switch on the illumination, it makes a world of difference.

Remember that scopes aren’t made to keep their light on constantly. While your red dot might get 50,000 hours or more, a scope’s illumination might only last 100 to 1,000 hours per battery depending on the scope.

Turn it on when you need it, turn it off when you’re done, and always have a spare battery in hand.

Total Elevation Adjustment: The total elevation adjustment of your scope is measured in MOA. This shows the range from top to bottom.

For instance, a scope with 110 MOA can adjust from the mechanical top to the mechanical bottom by 110 MOA. But in practice, because the zero is in the middle, you can only use about 55 MOA for long-distance shots with a normal mount.

Total elevation adjustments are key for long shots and depend on your cartridge.

For a .22 LR at 400 yards, you’ll need about 74 MOA and likely a canted mount. However, a 6.5 Creedmoor at the same distance only requires around 7 MOA or 2 MRAD. Extend that to 1,000 yards, and you’re looking at 30 MOA or roughly 9 MRAD.

Having more adjustment range is usually better, but it depends on what kind of shooting you do. For 1,000-yard shots with 6.5 Creedmoor using standard mounts, you’ll need a scope with at least 65 MOA total adjustment.

Generally speaking, the higher quality of scope you get the more adjustment it will have.

Many scopes will list their total elevation values in MRAD instead of MOA or will sometimes list both. If you’re not hip to the difference, take a look at our articles on MOA and MRAD!

Zero Stops: A zero stop feature halts the scope turret at a pre-set point.

Once you zero your scope, you adjust the zero stop to match your zero. This allows you to dial up for long shots and then easily return to your zero position afterward.

Zero stops are really nice for competition but aren’t required for hunting. They don’t hurt to have while on a hunt, but you don’t need them.

These are the basic specs to look at, once you have these worked out for what you need the rest are bonuses. 

Other features include multi-coated lens to help in low light and fog proof. 

Don’t forget to look over those spec sheets to see exactly what each scope offers!

6.5 Creedmoor Rifle Scope FAQS

What magnification range is suitable for a 6.5 Creedmoor rifle scope?

For general shooting, consider 3-9x or 4-12x magnification. For precision shooting, opt for 5-25x or higher.

What features are important for hunting scopes with a 6.5 Creedmoor rifle?

Look for lightweight, compact, and rugged scopes with waterproofing and low-light performance. Simple reticles aid quick target acquisition in hunting conditions.

What reticle options are suitable for 6.5 Creedmoor rifles?

Popular options include Mil-dot, BDC, MOA, and Christmas tree-style reticles. Choose them based on your personal preference and shooting needs.

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About Dave Chesson

Dave Chesson is prior Navy with a specialty in international arms dealing for the US government across multiple countries. Having traveled the world and abided by ATF and ITAR, Roy has a unique background in legal as well as practical capabilities of weapons deployment and use.

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1 COMMENTS

  1. I love mine on a 6.5 Wanabemoor practice gun. I use the EBR7C MOA reticle and zeroed at 13MOA. I can hold and shoot well past 1000yds and never click once with a Hornady plain 140BTHP @ 2725fps. When I click and do other adjustments they are dead nuts and return back perfectly. Some of my best days ever are pulling out my $500 Savage 10TSR and $600 scope and the guys shooting their 5K rifles with 5K scopes pack up and start talking or even ask if they can try it. Not one…NOT ONE has not commented similar to…..Wow I had no idea that was possible. Get off the internet, get out, get on that horse and ride it instead of just show it off.

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