5 Best Rifle Lights: Find the Right One For You

by Dave Chesson

December 14, 2023

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If you plan to use your rifle at night or in low light conditions, a rifle light is essential because you don’t want to be shooting what you can’t see. Personally, a rifle flashlight has helped me out more than once in low-light situations when I was out in the field. 

Rifle lights are flashlights mounted on your rifle and can make your firearm a lot more versatile and functional in the dark. You can use it to identify targets at night or even use it during the day in dark places.

There are a lot of options on the market and honestly, there isn’t a lot of information about the use cases for some rifle lights. So, after testing a bunch of lights, I’ve put together a list of rifle lights that I liked the best. 

Before we check out the reviews, let me tell you how a rifle light can help you. 

Why use a rifle light?

If you are a shooter who wants to be ready for low-light scenarios, bringing a rifle light helps you be prepared in several scenarios. Here’s how using one can make a serious difference:

  • Night hunting – I mainly use my rifle lights for night hunting and, apart from my scope, it is the most important accessory in my arsenal. When you are out in the dark, you need to make sure you can see your environment as well as identify your game to have a successful hunt. A good rifle light does just that; it lights up the area enough for you to see game and take shots from a safe distance.
  • Varmint control – Since varmints usually come out at dusk, having a rifle light is essential if your goal is reducing varmints on your property. The appropriate light for your rifle will help you identify pests more easily, expand your range, and enhance your accuracy while aiming. Sometimes, I’ve even used the bright lights to scare off varmints without shooting them. 
  • Home defense – Rifle lights can be highly effective for home defense. Before taking any action in a home defense situation, it is essential to identify the targets clearly, and a rifle light enables you to do that safely. They also provide a way for nonlethal defense, as you can temporarily blind intruders with the bright light and de-escalate the situation. 

Rifle lights are good accessories to have on hand for any shooter, but there’s no one rifle light that’ll be the best fit for all kinds of situations. In this list, I’ve recommended some lights that I’ve tested and instead of ranking them in any particular order, I’ve sorted them based on their best categories.

How I chose the best rifle lights

When it comes to rifle lights, I’ve navigated the dark and shadowy terrains enough to appreciate their critical role in precision shooting. Having spent countless hours honing my skills behind the scope, I’ve come to understand that optimal visibility isn’t just a luxury—it’s a game-changer.

I’ve delved into an extensive array of rifle lights, exploring their nuances, scrutinizing their performance, and putting them through their paces in various conditions. This isn’t just about ticking off a checklist; it’s about ensuring that when you need illumination, your gear delivers—every single time.

Sure, I’ve had my go-to brands and trusted models, but I also knew that a comprehensive rundown wasn’t complete without canvassing the preferences of my fellow sharpshooters. So, I consulted with them, tapped into their experiences, and ventured into uncharted territory, acquiring and testing anything that hadn’t yet crossed my path.

I’m not here to recite a spec sheet; I’m here to share the outcomes of real-world trials. Through this exhaustive process, I’ve curated a list that isn’t just a compilation of products; it’s a testament to hands-on, in-the-field evaluation. When I say these are the best rifle lights, it’s not a hasty conclusion—it’s the result of rigorous vetting and rigorous testing.

Mossberg 940 Pro Tactical Hero

Gun University’s Picks of the Best Rifle Lights

Best Rifle Lights

SureFire Scout Light Pro Dual Fuel
  • Durable
  • Can use two different battery types
  • Compatible with different mounts
Buy on Amazon
Best lightweight

Inforce WML Gen 2

Inforce WML Gen 2
  • Silent activation
  • Lightweight
  • Has different light modes
Buy on Amazon
Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2.0
  • Ability to charge without removing battery
  • Tail cap with tail switch port
  • Three activation modes
Buy on Amazon
Streamlight ProTac HLX
  • Durable
  • Comes with extra accessories
  • Compatible with SL-B26 and CR123A batteries
  • Three activation modes
Buy on Amazon
Cloud Defensive REIN 3.0
  • Can use two different battery types
  • High brightness
  • Durable
Check Price

Best Rifle Lights Spec Comparison

Below is a table of the specifications for weapon light. Click the name of the item to jump to that review.

Rifle LightMaterialLumensCandelaWeight (oz)Battery Life (hours)
SureFire Scout Light Pro Dual FuelAluminum1,200 - 1,50012,800 - 16,0005.5 1.25 - 1.5
Inforce WML Gen 2Glass reinforced nylon4004,0003.2 1.5
Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2Aluminum2,00017,7009.06 2.5
Streamlight ProTac HLXAluminum1,00027,6006.9 1.5
Cloud Defensive REIN 3.0Aluminum1,250100,0006.911

Best Rifle Lights

Here is our list for the best rifle lights.

  1. SureFire Scout Light Pro Dual Fuel
  2. Inforce WML Gen 2
  3. Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2
  4. Streamlight ProTac HLX
  5. Cloud Defensive REIN 3.0

Best Rifle Lights – Reviews

I’ve written detailed reviews of the best products for each category and listed factors that can help you choose the best one for your needs. 

Best overall SureFire Scout Light Pro Dual Fuel M640DF

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  • Brightness A
  • Ease of Use A
  • Durability A
  • Battery Life A

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SureFire Scout Light Pro Dual Fuel Specs

  • Material Aluminum
  • Lumens 1,200 – 1,500
  • Candela 12,800 – 16,000
  • Weight 5.5 oz
  • Battery life 1.25 – 1.5 hours

SureFire Scout Light Pro Dual Fuel Review

SureFire is the industry standard for rifle lights and that’s because they consistently make great rifle lights you can rely on, and the Scout Light Pro carries on this standard. 

I didn’t plan on getting the SureFire Scout Light Pro at first because I already had their SureFire M600DF Scout Light model, but that all changed when I saw the performance of the one my buddy had. The light was ultra bright, and I knew I had to get one for myself. 

Because the construction is solid, they make the body out of anodized aluminum and the lens is tempered glass, you don’t have to worry about durability or longevity. The O ring keeps it safe from the elements, and it’s got an IPX7 waterproof rating (meaning this unit will survive 30 minutes under 1 meter of water). The Scout Light Pro also only weighs 5.5 oz, so it won’t add much weight to your rifle’s barrel as well. 

What makes Scout Light Pro stand out to me though, is its brightness and consistency. The most important thing you want your rifle to do is to help you identify targets. In a high-pressure situation, it’s going to be really tough to make a good judgment call with poor visibility. That’s why I like the Scout Light Pro’s 1,200 lumens LED light; it concentrates the light into a powerful beam that can reach long distances and also has a good enough throw (the spread of the flashlight’s illumination) to properly light up surroundings. 

Since this is a dual fuel rifle light that accepts two kinds of batteries, the light output really depends on the type of battery you use. The Scout Light Pro gave me a 1,200 lumens output when I used two 123A lithium batteries. However, you can use a 18650 battery and go up to 1,500 lumens. I was pretty happy with the battery life as well; my rifle light lasted about an hour and 15 minutes, and if you use a 18650 battery, you can add 15 minutes to it. 

Installing and removing the flashlight from the gun is also fairly easy; it has a fully removable M75 mount, so I had no issues fixing it to my Picatinny rail. Even if you use a different rail type, you can always switch the mounts because you can find plenty of options for SureFire’s Scout series on the market. It also stays rock solid on the rail, so you won’t have any issues with it wobbling or messing with your gun’s balance.

Now, I have to warn you here that SureFire recommends using this light for medium to long range. This is not the light to use for close quarters. The light intensity can whiteout the immediate area—something I had to learn the hard way when I was mounting it on the rifle. A screw rolled under the sofa, and I turned on my Scout Light Pro to search for it. The light was so bright I couldn’t see anything at that distance. I had to pull out a much weaker flashlight and voilà, I found the screw in no time. 

SureFire’s Scout Light Pro is a solid choice, but it has a few issues that you should be aware of if you are thinking about getting one. Firstly, the SureFire Scout Light Pro requires the use of proprietary SureFire batteries to avoid damaging the light. One of my buddies had to replace his batteries and tried an aftermarket battery, but it ended up overheating the rifle light and burning it out.

Secondly, if you are looking for something versatile, SureFire wouldn’t be the best choice since it doesn’t come with a lot of modes. You have a blinking mode and a full power one, but you can’t really control the light output beyond that.

While there are other lights with more modes or lumens out there, SureFire’s Scout Light Pro’s dependability trumps them all. It also has an average shelf life of 10 years, so I know whenever I’m going to need it, it’s going to switch on, and it’s going to switch on with full power. 

SureFire Scout Light Pro Dual Fuel Pros and Cons

  • Durable
  • Can use two different battery types
  • Compatible with different mounts
  • Required to use with proprietary batteries
  • Limited modes

Best lightweight Inforce WML Gen 2

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  • Brightness B+
  • Ease of Use A
  • Durability A-
  • Battery Life A

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A-

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Inforce WML Gen 2 Specs

  • Material Glass reinforced nylon
  • Lumens 400
  • Candela 4,000
  • Weight 3.2 oz
  • Battery life 1.5 Hours

Inforce WML Gen 2 Review

If you are looking for a rifle light that won’t weigh down your barrel and mess with its balance, then I highly recommend going with the Inforce WML Gen 2. It is a lightweight but sturdy option for those who don’t want to add too much weight to their firearm.

What makes it so lightweight is the material and battery; they make the WML using glass reinforced nylon, and it only needs a single CR123 battery (included in the package). Most people think that reinforced nylon is far weaker than stuff like aluminum, but I would disagree. From my experience with the WML Gen 2, the reinforced nylon can take a lot of beating without cracking and, compared to aluminum, it doesn’t dent easily.

The WML Gen 2 is one of the rifle lights I’ve been using for the longest time and it pretty much looks like a standard flashlight, but there’s definitely more than meets the eye. The Inforce WML Gen 2, with its 400 lumens rating, is perfect for tactical situations and its wider beam pattern is perfect for both indoor and outdoor use. I also really like that the light head has cooling vents; this keeps the light from heating up when you are using it.

One of the biggest selling points of this model compared to the Gen 1 is its slanted thumb switch, which I found to be very comfortable and easy to operate, along with the safety feature that helps with making sure you don’t accidentally switch it on. The switch is also super silent, so it’s perfect for both hunting and tactical situations as it won’t scare away prey or give away your position.

The WML Gen 2 comes with three light modes, giving you a control over the pattern and activation conditions when using it: 

  • Constant on – the light switches on full power
  • Momentary on – the light stays switched on as long as you keep pressing the pressure pad
  • Strobe –  the light flickers and can be used for emergency signals.

Mounting it on a rifle was not a hassle at all since it came with a Picatinny mount and a thumbscrew, so I was able to install it on my AR-15 without any tools. It’s pretty solid once you get it mounted, and in all the years I’ve been using it, it hasn’t fallen off once.

While Inforce’s WML Gen 2 is a lightweight option that will last you for a while, there are a few issues. One is that this light is on the lower end based on light output, so while it’s fine for close and medium range shooting, it’s not the best choice for long-range shots at night. The other issue is that swapping out the battery can take a while; you have to remove the head of the light, so it’s a pain to do it on the field. 

If you are looking for a lightweight rifle light for general use, I highly recommend going with Inforce WML Gen 2. Unlike most lightweight rifle lights, the WML is made to last and also gives you a fantastic output perfect for close and medium range use.

Inforce WML Gen 2 Pros and Cons

  • Silent activation
  • Lightweight
  • Has different light modes
  • Low light output
  • Replacing batteries can be a hassle

Best for hunting Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2.0

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  • Brightness A
  • Ease of Use A-
  • Durability A
  • Battery Life A

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A

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Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2.0 Specs

  • Material Aluminum
  • Lumens 2,000
  • Candela 17,700
  • Weight 9.06 oz
  • Battery life 2.5 hours

Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2.0 Review

For night hunting, what you need is a bright light that can illuminate a wide area so you can spot game and hunt them from a safe distance. That’s why my pick for this category is the Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2.0.

What caught my attention with the Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2.0 is its incredible performance. The ProTac 2.0 is so blindingly bright that it puts every other flashlight at its price point to shame. With a whopping 2,000 lumens, it feels like I have my truck’s high beams on my rifle. 

I also really like the redesign of the tail cap from the previous model; it helps you attach a second tail switch to an O ring sealed port, which means you can switch your flashlight on using the inbuilt push button or the tail switch, whichever you like. Another plus about this model compared to the previous one is that you don’t have to remove the head to swap out batteries; this might look like a small fix, but I think it is a huge improvement as it makes the entire battery switching process painless.

The ProTac 2.0 also has the TEN-TAP® programming found in Streamlight products, which allows me to swap between three different modes: high/strobe, high only, and low/high. The high setting will give you the marketed 2,000 lumen output, while the low setting will give you a 250 lumen output, so it’s a pretty versatile light.

The battery life is pretty solid too. Here are the run times on different modes: 

  • High only – 2.5 hours 
  • High/Strobe – 4.5 hours 
  • Low/High – 11 hours

A nice surprise was that the batteries are rechargeable, and you can simply charge them while in the light using its USB C port.

The ProTac 2.0 also comes with a Picatinny 1913 rail mount, which is very versatile but in case you want a different mount, you can always swap it out easily. I don’t think you’ll have any issues fitting this unit on any gun, as it is compatible with most types of mounts. 

As for the cons for the ProTac 2.0, I found switching modes with the TEN-TAP® programming to be a bit of a hassle; you have to tap the button ten times, and on the tenth time, you hold until the light switches off, then release the button. Once it switches off, your light will change to the next mode. The other issue I have with it is that it uses proprietary batteries, meaning you have to buy the $40 ones from Streamlight and can’t use any aftermarket ones in a hurry. 

For hunters looking for a versatile hunting light, I don’t think you can go wrong with the Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2.0. Its powerful beam of light and three different modes make it a perfect choice for a hunting trip.  

Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2.0 Pros and Cons

  • Charging – Ability to charge without removing battery
  • Activation – Tail cap with tail switch port
  • Programable – Three activation modes
  • Programming – TEN-TAP® programming can be a bit confusing to use
  • Batteries – Uses proprietary batteries

Best budget Streamlight ProTac HLX

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  • Brightness A
  • Ease of Use A-
  • Durability A
  • Battery Life A

Our Grade

A

Reader’s Grade

B

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Streamlight ProTac HLX Specs

  • Material Aluminum
  • Lumens 1,000
  • Candela 27,600
  • Weight 6.9 oz
  • Battery life 1.5 Hours

Streamlight ProTac HLX Review

Another Streamlight made it on the list and that’s because Streamlight is one of my favorite brands who make high-quality rifle lights that won’t break the bank. If you are on a budget and are looking for a rifle light to get the job done, then my recommendation is to go with the Streamlight ProTac HLX.

For $140, the kit comes with a Picatinny rail mount and a M-LOK mount, a pressure pad switch, a push button tail cap, a pressure pad mount, a USB C charging cord, zip ties, and double-sided tape, making it a pretty sweet deal for the price.

There’s no sacrifice in quality when it comes to construction. It’s made of anodized aluminum with impact resistant tempered glass lens, so it’s plenty durable. The unit is also waterproof, but only for 30 minutes. This means you can take it out in the rain without any issues but submerging it in water will definitely break this light.

Just like the Streamlight ProTac Rail Mount 2.0, it comes with TEN-TAP® programming and has three different modes; it has high/strobe, high only, low/high. The high setting will give you the marketed 1,000 lumen output while the low setting will give you a 60 lumen output.

The battery life, like with any rifle light, is going to depend on the type of batteries you use. If you use Streamlight’s SL-B26 battery, you’ll get the following run time for each mode:

  • High only – about 1.33 – 1.5 hours
  • High/Strobe – about 2.5 to 3.25 hours
  • Low/High – about 20 to 23 hours 

Unlike the ProTac 2.0, which only allows proprietary batteries, you can also use two CR23A batteries with this one along with the Streamlight’s SL-B26 battery, but you’ll be sacrificing some run time. This feature is very welcome because I like the option to use CR123As if the SL-B26 runs out of charge or malfunctions.

While the Streamlight ProTac HLX is a good budget option, there are some issues worth considering if you are planning on picking one up. Firstly, the throw is not as great as some other options you can find in the market. It’s not a bad throw by any means, but I couldn’t see anything beyond 120 yards, so I don’t recommend this one for long range. 

The Streamlight ProTac HLX is also not great for close range; since it has a high lumens output, it is positively blinding at 25 yards, and you can’t use it beyond 100 yards or so. So while it’s good for medium range, it’s not a great option for either close range or long range. 

Another issue is the performance drastically changes depending on the battery you use. When I was using a Streamlight SL-B26 battery, I didn’t have any issues, but the moment I switched to CR23A batteries, the light started flickering with every shot. 

That said, considering the price, I’d say the Streamlight ProTac HLX delivers great value, so if you are on a budget, this is a great option to consider. 

Streamlight ProTac HLX Pros and Cons

  • Durable
  • Accessories – Comes with extra accessories
  • Batteries – Compatible with SL-B26 and CR123A batteries
  • Three activation modes
  • Programming – TEN-TAP® programming is a bit confusing to use
  • Low throw distance

Best premium Cloud Defensive REIN 3.0

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  • Brightness A+
  • Ease of Use A
  • Durability A
  • Battery Life B+

Our Grade

A

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Cloud Defensive REIN 3.0 Specs

  • Material Aluminum
  • Lumens 1,250
  • Candela 100,000
  • Weight 6.91 oz
  • Battery life 1 hour

Cloud Defensive REIN 3.0 Review

If you are looking for maximum performance and price is no object, then my recommendation for you is the Cloud Defensive REIN. Cloud Defensive has been one of my top choices for premium rifle lights, and their OWL model is one of my all-time favorites. I was very impressed with its performance, and that’s why I bought the REIN 3.0 as soon as it came out.

The REIN 3.0 not only met my already high expectations but also managed to exceed them. Now, the REIN 3.0 may not be the lightest or the most compact rifle light out there, but in terms of sheer power, there’s nothing out there that can beat its 100,000 candelas and 1,250 lumens worth of output. 

The light can easily cut through fog and rain even in the dark to give you a clear visual and identify targets. I tested it out on my buddy’s farm, and the REIN easily cut through the dark as if it were parting a curtain. I was able to easily identify targets at well over a hundred yards and with this one, I can see myself picking off varmints from a very safe distance.

That said, it wouldn’t be the best pick for home defense mainly because it’s too blinding to use at close quarters. However, if you are a hunter or someone who wants to get the most powerful light out there to see what it can do, then the REIN will not disappoint you. 

The construction is fantastic as well; it has a nice anodized aluminum finish and comes with a field serviceable lens and a tail-cap. It also works with all sorts of light mounts out there, so you don’t have to worry about it not fitting your gun’s rail. 

I also like the dual fuel battery upgrade from the OWL model; with the OWL, you could only use proprietary batteries from Cloud Defensive and if you used anything else, it would void your warranty. So it pleasantly surprised me to find out REIN allows dual fuel and you can use CR123 batteries with it as well. Now, you won’t get the same performance as a 18650 battery, but the light will work without any issues. 

Another great battery feature I like is the battery jack; Cloud Defensive made REIN’s battery compartment adjustable for different 18650 battery sizes. This means you won’t have to worry about the recoil from your rifle dislodging your battery or the battery coming loose. 

As for activation switches, you get both a pressure switch and a click tail cap. The pressure switch is great for momentary use, and if you want constant on use, you can always switch it on using the click tail cap. 

Though the REIN is definitely a pack leader on the power front, it’s worth remembering that it is a premium model; it retails at $400, which makes it one of the most expensive rifle lights on the market. Personally, I think the Cloud Defensive REIN gives enough value for the price, but if you are on a budget, this might not be the one for you. The REIN is also bulky compared to many other lights on the market, so if you are looking for something that doesn’t add weight to your barrel, I recommend looking at something like the Inforce WML instead.

Other than that, I have no actual quality complaints about the REIN. It is a fantastic light whose 100,000 candela worth of power is hard to beat, so if you don’t mind the price tag, go for it.

Cloud Defensive REIN 3.0 Pros and Cons

  • Batteries – Can use two different battery types
  • High brightness
  • Durable
  • Costly

Buyers guide

Rifle lights are excellent accessories that can be helpful for any shooter, but finding the right one for you and your gun can be difficult, especially for beginner shooters. That’s why I put together this buyer’s guide to help you pick the right rifle light for you. 

What are the different factors to consider when choosing a rifle light?

There are several factors you need to consider when looking for the right rifle light for your gun, but some of them are more important than others depending on your priorities. Here are some specs I look at when purchasing a rifle light:

Purpose – The right flashlight for your rifle depends on what you want to use your rifle for. If you are looking at self defense, go with a compact and lightweight rifle light with 200-500 lumens in power so you don’t blind yourself in a home invasion. If you are planning on some nighttime hunting though, you are going to need a rifle light that has a long battery life and some good beam distance so you can sight your prey. 

Brightness – With a rifle light, the most important thing to look for is brightness. Brightness is what determines how powerful the light is and how far it can reach. I specifically look at the following specs to judge the brightness of a rifle light.

  • Lumens – Lumens measure the total amount of light you get from a flashlight in a given amount of time. A common mistake that a lot of shooters make is getting the bulb with the highest lumens because they think that’s the best one, but this is not always the case; it’s really going to depend on what you want to use your light for. I usually go for a light between 200 – 500 lumens for self defense and a light with a brightness around 1,000 – 2,000 lumens for night hunting. Anything below 160 lumens won’t be powerful enough to give enough visibility for general use.
  • Candela – Candela is basically how concentrated the light is in a particular direction. In tactical situations, higher candelas are great as they can overpower the incoming light source and give you a better glimpse of your target. Keep in mind that the highest candelas are not always the best; in fact, very high candelas can work against you for short-distance hunts and blind you. So always think about what you’ll be using your rifles for before buying rifle lights. 
  • Beam size and shape/ throw – Throw is basically how much of the environment your flashlight can light up. Having more throw is great for night hunting; it lights up a large area and helps you hunt from a safe distance. For home defense and other indoor use, I recommend going with a balanced throw. It lights up your 9 – 3 O’clock positions without blinding you or giving away your position too soon.

Battery life – Battery life is super important to any shooter, so most of the options I’ve recommended here have a fairly decent battery life. That said, how much battery life you want will depend on your needs. If you’re planning on going hunting, I recommend going for disposable batteries that you can swap out on the field since you’ll be out for a longer period of time. If you use your rifle for self defense though, you want a flashlight that has a good standby battery life and gives you enough time to identify your target and shoot before you have to replace the battery. In that case, I recommend going with rechargeable batteries here. 

Construction, durability, and weight – When choosing a flashlight for your rifle, it almost always comes down to compromising between weight and durability. Most lightweight rifle lights don’t even feel like they are on your rifle and don’t compromise the balance of your forearm, but the trade-off is that they are very fragile–they will crack if you drop them and are not shockproof, so they won’t withstand a lot of rounds of recoil from your rifle. 

On the other hand, if you want a rifle light that lasts, then you can go for a light that is made of aircraft grade aluminum. These are waterproof, can withstand a lot of recoil, and will last you a while, but they will add some weight to your gun’s muzzle and throw it off balance. 

Mount – The mount your rifle light uses should be compatible with your rifle, so check the type of mount on a rifle light before you make a purchase. It’s always a good idea to go for lights that fit a standard Picatinny or Weaver rails, because most rifles use them. One thing to keep in mind is that while Picatinny rails can fit accessories with Weaver mounts because of the rail’s increased width, Weaver rails won’t fit accessories with a Picatinny mount. 

Activation switches – For control options and activation switches, look for something that’s easy to handle and use. When you are working with a high-powered rifle like an AR-15, the last thing you want to be doing is fumbling in the dark to switch it on or off. I personally like the pressure-switch positioning activation system because I can place it in my grip and control it as necessary. There are also some flashlights you can activate by tapping on them, but I find them to be unreliable. If you are left handed, look for an ambidextrous switch so you don’t have to adjust your grip to switch it on.

Control options – I recommend going for a flashlight that has at least 2 – 3 modes because you can use it in different situations that require different types of lighting. You usually get a high, medium, and low mode with most flashlights, and newer models also have a strobing mode, which can be used to send distress signals in case of an emergency.

Now that you know how to choose the right rifle for you, let’s take a look at how you can mount it on your rifle. 

How do you mount a flashlight on a rifle? 

Properly mounting your rifle light on the gun lets you operate it more easily and saves you a world of trouble in the long run because incorrectly mounted flashlights can get easily damaged.

Ideally, you want to make sure your rifle light is mounted on the top of the rail and as close to the front as possible since this helps you avoid any shadows while shooting. The mounting process depends on your light; some lights need special tools, while the others come with a clamp style system that you can use to fix the light on the rail. 

I personally prefer clamp style flashlights because they are hassle-free and I can switch them out easily when I’m out on the field. When you choose a rifle light, make sure it doesn’t weigh down your gun too much and can be fixed at an angle that won’t cast shadows on your aim. 

After you’ve mounted your rifle on the gun, make sure to test it out before taking it out hunting. Here are some tips to get familiar with your rifle light. 

What are some tips for using a rifle light? 

Once you’ve bought your rifle light and mounted it on your gun, I recommend practicing with it to get the hang of using a rifle light. Here are some tips to help you get started.

  • Make sure your rifle is always pointing to where your light is shining. It helps keep you and any bystanders safe.
  • In case of an emergency, try to turn on your light only when you need it. Your light can easily give away your position in the dark, and you don’t want that to happen.
  • A clean flashlight lens gives you better lighting, so keep your lens clean. Make sure to always clean your lens with a rubber eraser before you go out hunting and consider adding some tape to the lens during the day to avoid dust or any carbon build up from the muzzle. 

Keep these in mind, get some practice with rifle light, and you are prepared for any and all low light situations.

Conclusion

Rifle lights are some of the best optics you can get for your rifle, and taking the time to find the one can really help you out in the long run. The right light is a highly personal choice, so after reading the reviews, make sure you shop around and test a couple of them out until you find the best fit.  

Rifle Lights FAQs

How many lumens should a weapon light have?

200 – 500 lumens is a good amount for self defense and for hunting. You can go for something that’s within 1,000 – 2,000 lumens. 

What should I look for in a weapon light?

Some good starting points are the brightness of the light indicated by the candela and the lumens, what you want to use the light for, compatibility with your rifle, and battery life. 

What is the brightest weapon light available?

The Cloud Defender REIN is the brightest weapon light available in the current market. It has an output of 1,250 lumens and 100,000 candelas.

What is a good light for AR-15?

Some good lights for the AR-15 would be the SureFire Scout Lite Pro, Inforce WML, and Cloud Defensive REIN 3.0. 

What rifle light does the military use? 

SureFire rifle lights are a favorite among the military and are designed with military use in mind.

What is the most durable weapon light?

The Cloud Defensive OWL is made of strong aluminum and is IPX8 rated for a depth of 200 feet for 24 hours, making it a very durable option.

Do you need a strobe function in your weapon light?

The short answer is no, it is a nice feature to have, but practically speaking, you won’t be able to comfortably shoot your target when the light keeps switching on and off rapidly.

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About Dave Chesson

Dave Chesson is prior Navy with a specialty in international arms dealing for the US government across multiple countries. Having traveled the world and abided by ATF and ITAR, Roy has a unique background in legal as well as practical capabilities of weapons deployment and use.

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