5 Best Beam Reloading Scales (+ Buyers Guide)

by Dave Chesson

August 23, 2023

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My buddy who started reloading ammo recently had run into some accuracy issues while weighing the charges to refill his rounds, and was looking for a reliable scale. His measurements had turned out to be inconsistent, and he ended up reloading similar rounds with different amounts of gunpowder. So he had a question for me: Are beam reloading scales a better option to weigh shot charges accurately? 

When reloading spent cartridges, it’s important to make sure the charges that go in the cartridge casing are in the correct amount–or else your newly reloaded shots can be faulty. This is where beam reloading scales can help, since they let you weigh your charges super accurately and leave very little room for error. 

I compiled a guide on the best beam reloading scales I’ve used for those who, like my buddy, are looking for reliable scales for reloading ammo. I have also added a buyers guide to help you decide on which scale to buy. Before we get to the list of best beam reloading scales though, let’s find out how to use one. 

How to Use a Beam Reloading Scale 

Getting started with a beam scale for reloading ammo can be challenging at first, but it gets easier once you get the hang of it. Let’s have a look at a beam reloading scale and how you can use it to weigh charges. 

Beam Relaoding Scales Schematic
  • Step 1 – Calibrating makes sure the scale reads accurately by ‘zeroing’ it, which means leveling the zero on the beam to the pointer when the weighing pan is empty. If the scale doesn’t read zero, you have to place it on level ground and adjust the leveling foot until the beam zeroes. That said, most beam scales come factory-calibrated, and you can follow the user manual for any further adjustments. 
  • Step 2 – Weighing the charges has to be done carefully because even a single-grain difference can throw off the performance of your shot. First, you have to add the gunpowder or shot pellets into the weighing pan in small amounts. Next, you need to guess the weight and adjust the poises (sliding weights) along the beam. For example, if you think the charge weighs 150 grains, you need to move the main poise along the beam scale to get to the 150 mark. If the beam doesn’t level to zero, you need to move the main poise and the small poise (which indicates decimal amounts) back and forth until you get the reading to zero. A good practice is to look at the scale from the eye level; it helps avoid errors caused by an indirect line of sight. 
  • Step 3 – Maintenance is important in beam reloading scales to make sure you get accurate readings consistently. Consider zeroing (calibrating) your scale regularly to maintain consistent accuracy. You can also use check weight sets with different grain amounts to test the scale and confirm it gives accurate readings. Make sure to wipe the weighing pan with a dry cloth after every use, because if gunpowder residue remains in the pan, it can seriously throw off your reading. Try to keep the beam reloading scale at a designated, level surface without moving it, because an uneven base can make it difficult to get to zero. 

Now, beam reloading scales can look like they need some work, but they are accurate and consistently reliable, making them an important part of any reloading kit. 

Gun University’s Choices of the Best Beam Reloading Scales

Best Beam Reloading Scales

RCBS M500 Mechanical Scale
  • Ambidextrous
  • Uses magnets to stabilize the weighing pan
  • Efficient readings
  • Consistent accuracy
Buy on Amazon
Hornady Lock-N-Load Balance Beam Scale
  • Reasonably priced
  • Easy-to-read laser-etched beam
  • Uses magnets to stabilize the weighing pan
Buy on Amazon
RCBS M1000 Magnetic Powder Scale
  • Ambidextrous
  • Easy to set up and use
  • Uses magnets to stabilize the weighing pan
  • Comes with a dust/storage cover
Buy on Amazon
OHAUS 5-0-5 Reloading Beam Scale
  • Highly accurate results
  • Magnetic stabilization to speed reloading
  • High readability
Buy on Amazon
Lee Precision Safety Powder Scale
  • Precise readings
  • Durable
  • Ideal for weighing small to medium loads
Buy on Amazon

Beam Reloading Scales Spec Comparison

Below is a table of the specifications for each of the beam reloading scales.

Reloading ScaleWeight (oz)Capacity (grains)MaterialGrain Accuracy
RCBS M500 Mechanical Scale16505Die-cast metal+/-0.1
Hornady Lock-N-Load Balance Beam Scale18500Cast iron+/-0.1
RCBS M1000 Magnetic Powder Scale171000Composite+/-0.1
OHAUS 5-0-5 Reloading Beam Scale9.6511Metal+/-0.1
Lee Precision Safety Powder Scale14.6100Phenolic plastic+/-0.05

Best Beam Reloading Scales

Here is our list for the best beam reloading scales.

  1. RCBS M500 Mechanical Scale
  2. Hornady Lock N loaded Balance Beam Scale
  3. RCMS M1000 Magnetic Powder Scale
  4. OHAUS 5-0-5 Reloading Beam Scale
  5. Lee Precision Safety Powder Scale

Best Beam Reloading Scales – Reviews

While the beam reloading scales I’ve chosen are all performer great, I’ve sorted them according to their best feature. This can help you narrow the choices down to a beam reloading scale that works for your needs. 

Best overall RCBS M500 Mechanical Scale

RCBS M500 Mechanical Scale Featured Image

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  • Durability A+
  • Stability A-
  • Accuracy A+
  • Ease of use A

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RCBS M500 Mechanical Scale

  • Weight 1 lb
  • Capacity 505 grains
  • Material Die cast metal
  • Grain accuracy +/- 0.1

RCBS M500 Mechanical Scale Review

My overall best pick was an easy choice because the RCBS M500 Mechanical Scale comes from a long line of scales known for their convenience and consistent accuracy. This model is no different. It also made our list of best reloading scales for hand-loading ammo as the only mechanical scale among the electronic ones. That speaks a lot about its performance.

The efficiency on the RCBS M500 is superior to most beam scales I’ve used so far, which is impressive because taking too long to weigh is a major concern with all beam scales. The RCBS M500 has a magnetic damping system (a mechanism to make the beam settle quickly) installed near the pointer and it gives me fast readings, which is awesome for when I measure a range of charges in one go. It’s not as immediate as a reading from an electronic scale would be, but it’s still faster than most beam scales. Besides, I use the RCBS M500 for its consistent accuracy and the efficiency is a great perk to come out of it. 

The RCBS M500 comes factory-calibrated, but I used my check weights set to confirm the readings were accurate and true enough. They were spot on at 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 300 grains. When I first got it, I checked its repeatability by measuring the same check weight (100 grain) 15 consecutive times. And what do you know, the beam zeroed every time I moved the main poise to the 100 mark on the scale. I calibrate the beam scale often and measure check weights off and on, and it hasn’t given me a wrong reading even after all these years. It’s a relief that this is a beam reloading scale I can count on, because I know for sure I’m not over-filling my cartridges. 

The beam scale is pretty readable as well. The scale is black with clear white markings on it, so the contrast makes it easy on the eyes when reading the scale. Another nice touch is that the scale is ambidextrous; this scale comes with weight indicators on both sides, which makes it easy for anyone to turn the scale around to use it with their dominant hand.

The RCBS M500 has a die-cast aluminum base, which is designed to be rugged on the reloading table, and this helps keep the beam scale stable. I especially liked this feature because the RCBS M500 is a bit lightweight at 1 lb and isn’t as hardy as I’d like it to be. 

The weight is the only issue I’ve had with it and I managed to get around it thanks to the rugged base. However, I’ve heard some folks mention that the make is too flimsy and too easy to knock over. It comes down to preference though, and if you like a little more sturdiness on your beam scale, there are heavier options out there. 

The cost is a little above the average ($95 – $100) at around 140 bucks. I do think that’s a reasonable price when considering the consistent accuracy and ease of use you get out of the RCBS M500 Mechanical Scale.

RCBS M500 Mechanical Scale Pros and Cons

  • Ambidextrous
  • Uses magnets to stabilize the weighing pan
  • Efficient readings
  • Consistent accuracy
  • Lightweight

Best stability Hornady Lock-N-Load Balance Beam Scale 

Hornady Lock-N-Load Balance Beam Scale Featured Image

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  • Durability A
  • Stability A
  • Accuracy A+
  • Ease of use A-

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Hornady Lock-N-Load Balance Beam Scale Specs

  • Weight 1 lb 2 oz.
  • Capacity 500
  • Material Cast iron
  • Grain accuracy +/- 0.1

Hornady Lock-N-Load Balance Beam Scale Review

The Hornady Lock-N-Load Balance Beam Scale is my top pick for best stability. Not only because of its heavy weight and material, but also because the sturdiness of the scale helps maintain consistent accuracy. 

Stability is super important in a beam reloading scale. When a scale is sturdy, it’s more likely to hold its place on the reloading bench and less likely to be affected by environmental factors. These factors could be currents of wind from hot air vents or breeze. The Hornady Lock-N-Load Scale weighs around 1 lb 2 oz. This makes it a lot heavier than other beam scales of 500-grain capacity and far more stable than most beam scales on my list. 

It’s a relief that the scale doesn’t move an inch, even when the door slams in my gun room. Once I’ve placed it balanced and zeroed on my counter, I’d hate to lose the balance to a gust of wind and start leveling and calibrating all over again. I can trust this scale to stay in place thanks to the weight, so I’m not too worried about the calibration being thrown off.

The Hornady Lock-N-Load Scale I’ve been using for a few years is made from cast iron, so it’s solid and durable. Lately, I’ve heard from a few friends that the model they’ve bought is made from plastic. I can’t speak for the stability of any model other than the one I’ve used, but if your scale doesn’t budge easily, it’s sturdy enough for a few hours of weighing charges. 

The accuracy of this beam scale is top-notch; it’s sensitive enough to measure one-tenth of a grain, similar to most beam scales on this list. I tested the scale with my check weights, and the reading did not disappoint. The scale has been consistently giving me accurate readings, so I only do a test for accuracy every 50th or so round of weighing charges.  

The Hornady Lock-N-Load Scale is pretty easy to use because of two reasons. First, the numbers and the scale are laser-etched on the beam. This provides a good contrast and makes it readable even in low light (as a general rule of thumb, don’t try to use any beam reloading scale in low light). The second reason is that the Hornady Lock-N-Load Scale comes with a magnetic damping system that uses magnets to quickly stabilize the beam and weighing pan once you add your charges into the pan. 

The only issue I had with it was that it took me a while to calibrate. The Hornady Lock-N-Load Scale has a screwed-in nail instead of a leveling foot, so it was a bit difficult to adjust the nail and get the scale to read zero. This is one reason I like the stability on this beam scale. Even though it’s difficult to calibrate, the Hornady Lock-N-Load Scale stays calibrated thanks to its sturdiness. 

This beam scale costs around $90, which is pretty average. When you consider the consistent accuracy, durability, and stability you get out of the Hornady Lock-N-Load Balance Beam Scale, you’d definitely be getting more than your money’s worth. 

Hornady Lock-N-Load Balance Beam Scale Pros and Cons

  • Reasonably priced
  • Easy-to-read laser etched beam
  • Uses magnets to stabilize the weighing pan
  • Tricky to calibrate

Best capacity RCBS M1000 Magnetic Powder Scale

RCBS M1000 Magnetic Powder Scale Featured Image

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  • Durability A+
  • Stability A+
  • Accuracy B
  • Ease of use A

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RCBS M1000 Magnetic Powder Scale Specs

  • Weight 1 lb 5 oz.
  • Capacity 1000
  • Material Composite
  • Grain accuracy +/- 0.1

RCBS M1000 Magnetic Powder Scale Review

RCBS scales have served me well for years, with amazing accuracy and efficiency. I am not surprised two of them made the list, this time as the pick for best capacity. 

The RCBS M1000 Magnetic Powder Scale has an impressive 1,000-grain capacity. This feature makes it the ideal choice for those handling large loads or multiple loads. It has an accuracy of +/- 0.1 grain sensitivity, so it can give you consistent measurements. 

One feature I especially like in the RCBS M1000 is its three-poise system: 

  • Main poise – adjustment options from 0 to 1000 grains
  • Top medium poise – 0 to 20 grains in 1 grain increments
  • Bottom small poise – 0 to 1 grain adjustments in 0.1 grain increments

The scale is helpful for measuring big loads accurately by allowing you to balance weights with small increments. 

The RCBS M1000 has an easy setup as well. The poises are easy to adjust, the grooves along the beam hold the poises securely, and they designed the weighing pan to not tip over. This makes the loading process pretty much hassle-free. This unit has a magnetic damping system, and it really speeds up stabilization, cutting down a lot of time spent on waiting for the beam to settle. 

The leveling foot is also pretty adjustable so the scale can be leveled easily on various surfaces, making the reloading process efficient. There’s a check weight to help you calibrate, but the scale also comes factory-calibrated. I only had to use the check weight to help confirm the accuracy of the scale. This scale is also ambidextrous, making it a pretty flexible purchase for anyone.

One thing I noticed while measuring some rifle loads for a few hours is that the scale holds accuracy. Of course, I made sure to wipe the weighing pan to remove powder residue a few times, but I didn’t have to recalibrate during the entire process.   

The biggest concern I have about the RCBS M1000 is that the leveling foot sometimes moves on its own. I get the feeling it’s because the leveling foot is designed to be adjustable, but I wish there was a little more resistance so there won’t be space for any unintended movement while measuring. 

My next concern is the cost; at around $190, this is by far the most expensive beam reloading scale I’ve used. You might get a few bucks knocked off depending on your retailer, but it might still be a bit above the average cost for a beam scale. 

If you do get a good deal though, the RCBS M1000 Magnetic Powder Scale is completely worth the investment. This one is your best bet for capacity, accuracy, consistency, and ease of use when measuring large loads.

RCBS M1000 Magnetic Powder Scale Pros and Cons

  • Ambidextrous
  • Easy to set up and use
  • Uses magnets to stabilize the weighing pan
  • Durable
  • Leveling foot comes loose sometimes
  • Expensive

Best compact OHAUS 5-0-5 Reloading Beam Scale

OHAUS 5-0-5 Reloading Beam Scale Featured Image

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  • Durability A-
  • Stability B
  • Accuracy A
  • Ease of use A

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OHAUS 5-0-5 Reloading Beam Scale Specs

  • Weight 9.6 oz.
  • Capacity 511 grains
  • Material Metal
  • Grain accuracy +/- 0.1

OHAUS 5-0-5 Reloading Beam Scale Review

The OHAUS 5-0-5 Reloading Beam Scale became my pick for best compact because its small size, without compromising on accuracy, consistency, and ease of use.

They built this scale small, so it’s very convenient to store even if you don’t have a dedicated space for reloading ammo. It’s important to keep beam scales covered up against dust and liquid particles, and with a compact scale like the OHAUS 5-0-5, this becomes much easier to do.

The calibration on this scale is pretty straightforward–you get a couple of aluminum check weights of different grain sizes. All I had to do was to place the scale on a level surface and balance it using the leveling foot to get the reading to zero. It was easy enough to do, but the process took more time than other beam scales on this list.  

I expected the accuracy of the scale to be pretty good, as OHAUS is known for making reliable measuring equipment, and it certainly did not disappoint. The OHAUS 5-0-5 is highly sensitive and accurate to one tenth of a grain, giving me precise readings every time I use it. Once calibrated, it holds zero for many rounds of measuring charges, so I don’t have to worry about consistency on the scale. The OHAUS 5-0-5 also has a magnetic damping system, which means the beam settles quickly without affecting the scale’s accuracy and sensitivity.

Although the beam is made of black aluminum, it has a black and white high visibility faceplate with a black poise, which makes the reading clear and easy to see. Some scales use less contrasting colors, which is just inconvenient, but this scale doesn’t make me strain to see the reading. 

One thing I have some trouble getting around is the flimsy feel of the OHAUS 5-0-5. It’s extremely lightweight at around 10 oz. and doesn’t give me enough confidence about the stability of the scale. It holds its place because the base is rugged and allows some friction, but I wish OHAUS had filled up the hollow metal frame with something solid, like lead plates. I’m actually thinking of filling up my scale with lead shot and spray foam to make it more stable.

The stability issue doesn’t really compromise on the scale’s performance though. You get the accuracy, readability, and ease of use bundled together in a compact beam scale for a good price at $75. This makes the OHAUS 5-0-5 Reloading Beam Scale a handy option for a beam reloading scale. 

OHAUS 5-0-5 Reloading Beam Scale Pros and Cons

  • Highly accurate results
  • Magnetic stabilization to speed reloading
  • High readability
  • Not very stable
  • Slow

Best budget Lee Precision Safety Powder Scale

Lee Precision Safety Powder Scale Featured Image

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  • Durability A-
  • Stability A
  • Accuracy A
  • Ease of use B

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Lee Precision Safety Powder Scale Specs

  • Weight 14.6 oz.
  • Capacity (grain) 100
  • Material Phenolic plastic
  • Grain accuracy +/- 0.05

Lee Precision Safety Powder Scale Review

I chose the Lee Precision Safety Powder Scale as my best budget pick. Even with a price tag of 40 bucks, the scale has the accuracy, consistency, and the durability of higher-priced beam scales. 

This scale is very precise and accurate, as it comes calibrated with weights that are certified traceable to the United States Bureau of Standards. It’s also very sensitive because it can accurately read to +/-0.05 grain (one twentieth of a grain) and gives you precise measurements even with small loads. 

This scale works best for reloading around 20-30 cartridges per hour under 100 grain. The grain capacity is a lot lower compared to most beam scales, but if you’re using this to measure small loads or to cross check the accuracy of another scale, this can serve you well. I have a couple of electronic scales I use for convenience. I use the Lee Precision Scale as a backup option if the batteries run out while I’m weighing a series of rounds. The Lee Precision Scale also helps me confirm the accuracy of my electronic scales, which is pretty handy.

They made the beam from phenolic plastic, and the sturdiness and high resistance of this material can withstand minor falls and can last well for several years. I didn’t have a lot of faith in a plastic beam reloading scale, but it’s been nearly 5 years since I first bought it and it still doesn’t show much wear or hasn’t given me false readings. That said, I do take the time to recalibrate the scale from time to time so it stays consistent.  

Because the Lee Precision Scale is extremely sensitive, I’ve noticed it can get affected by environmental factors like temperature and vibrations, so this scale works best in environments with minimal air movement. I recommend doing your reloading measurements indoors and using a separate table to support the scale, away from windows and air vents.

The other issue is that the Lee Precision Scale is a bit slow to set up and get used to because the beams and the poises are not very easy to use, especially if you are familiar with new and user-friendly beam reloading scales. Watching a few video tutorials can help you get the hang of it, but it definitely requires a bit of experience to handle right out of the box.  

The Lee Precision Safety Powder Scale is a durable, consistent, and accurate option for those on a budget or in need of a manual backup for electronic scales. 

Lee Precision Safety Powder Scale Pros and Cons

  • Precise readings
  • Durable
  • Ideal for weighing small to medium loads
  • Slow to set up
  • Easily affected by environmental factors

Buyers guide

Choosing a good beam scale can help you reload ammo with precise charges, so getting one that fits your requirements is important. I’ve put together this buyer’s guide to point you in the right direction toward purchasing a beam reloading scale that meets your requirements. 

Choosing between mechanical and electronic scales

Mechanical scales (like the beam reloading scales on this list) and electronic scales both have their own pros and cons, and one is not really better than the other. Here’s a laook at how each performs in several categories that I feel are the most important to consider when evaluating your options.

Mechanical reloading scaleElectronic reloading scale
AccuracyConsistent and reliable, needs recalibration from time to timeAccuracy can get affected by battery issues, overheating, vibrations etc. 
Functioning mechanismNo external power needed, but the mechanical parts have to be well-adjustedOperated by electricity from batteries or a power outlet
Ease of useSome effort needed. The scale has to be calibrated and checked for accuracy, and weighing takes some effort as well Extremely easy to use, only requires switching on and placing the charges on the scale
Time  Takes some time to get accurate measurementsResults are immediate
CostAverages around $90-$100Averages around $50
DurabilityOften made from cast metal with high durabilityOften made from a plastic material with low durability

Personally, I use a few mechanical beam scales because they are consistently reliable and my reloading setup is stationed at home, so I don’t have a need to carry it anywhere. If I had to take a reloading scale to the range though, I would go for an electronic scale because it’s much more convenient than taking a mechanical one and setting it up. 

Finding the best reloading scale for you comes down to your personal needs, priorities, and the complexity of the ammunition reloading you plan to do. Let’s take a look at some factors you should consider when narrowing down your options.

Factors to consider when choosing a beam reloading scale

These are some of the factors you should look at when figuring out what you need from a beam reloading scale.

  • Accuracy – The weight of the charge affects the performance of your shot, so you have to be as accurate as possible when reloading ammo. Most beam reloading scales have an accuracy of +/- 0.1 (one tenth of a grain) and it’s good to look for that grain accuracy as a standard. There are beam scales with even more sensitivity up to one twentieth of a grain, but to get started with reloading ammo, +/- 0.1 grain accuracy is just enough. 
  • Capacity – The most common capacity for beam reloading scales is 500-grain, and this works for almost any reloader. If you reload cartridges with a high load though, you can go for a scale with 1000-grain capacity, but it will drive up the cost of the scale a bit. If you’re only using the beam scale for small loads or to check the accuracy of electronic scales, a low-capacity beam scale at 100-grains might work.
  • Size and Weight – While most scales come in roughly the same dimensions, they usually vary in weight. Heavier beam scales that weigh over 1 lb can hold up well against environmental factors like vibrations and breeze, giving you stability and helping maintain consistent accuracy. Lightweight and compact beam scales can be stored easily, plus they are more convenient to carry around. 
  • Durability – Beam reloading scales are often made from composite metal, so their durability is often reliable. Plastic material is usually easy to break and can soften in heat, so if your choice of a beam scale is made of plastic, make sure the material is treated to last long. 
  • Ease of use – Generally,beam scales are not considered user-friendly, but there are few things you can consider to pick out a beam scale that’s easy enough to use. Look out for an easily adjustable leveling foot to help with calibration, and make sure the numbers and grading on the scale are clearly visible. If you’re left-handed, look out for beam scales designed with markers on both sides of the beam for better accessibility.

These factors can help you decide on a beam reloading scale to purchase, and once you put some effort into setting it up and getting the hang of the scale, you’ve got a reliable device to help make your ammunition reloads much easier. 

Conclusion

Reloading your spent cartridges is delicate business, but with the right tools, you can design your own ammo and save a few bucks while you’re at it. That’s why a beam reloading scale is a must-have in your reloading kit; it can help you weigh the right amount of charges for a shot that performs as same as (and often better than) off-the-shelf ammo. Don’t hesitate to pick out a beam reloading scale that best fits your needs, even if it’s tricky to operate. Once you get the hang of it, your charges will come out consistently accurate. 

Best Beam Reloading Scales FAQs

How accurate are beam scales for reloading ammo?

Beam scales can be accurate within one tenth (0.1) of a grain for reloading ammo. The accuracy can change slightly with different models, but as long as you zero the scale before using it, you’ll be good to go. Consider using a set of check weights to routinely verify the accuracy of your scale.  

What is the best scale for weighing powder?

The RCBS M500 is a great option to weigh gunpowder because it’s accurate to one tenth of a grain and maintains consistent accuracy. It comes with a tip-proof weighing pan to make sure the gunpowder doesn’t tip over, and has a rugged aluminum base for stability. 

How do I choose a reloading scale?

Choose a reloading scale according to the capacity and precision you need. Consider the number of rounds you will be reloading and the amount of powder required per round to decide on the capacity. The precision of your scale also helps make your rounds consistent, so choosing a scale that’s accurate to 0.1 of a grain is a pretty safe bet. You can also consider other features like durability and ease of use to pick a well-rounded scale. 

Which is better – a mechanical or a digital scale?

Both types of scales have their pros and cons, and the best choice for you depends on your requirements. Mechanical scales are a better option if you need consistently accurate readings on a reloading setup stationed at your home. Digital scales are easy to carry around and give fast readings, so they are a better fit if you need to take a scale to the range. 

Do scales lose accuracy over time?

Wear and tear over time can make scales lose their accuracy, but you can solve this by calibrating your scale when you notice inconsistent readings. 

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About Dave Chesson

Dave Chesson is prior Navy with a specialty in international arms dealing for the US government across multiple countries. Having traveled the world and abided by ATF and ITAR, Roy has a unique background in legal as well as practical capabilities of weapons deployment and use.

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